3di patch 2 2 1 home 123


valid until 2018/1/23

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14.02.2018 – A common example of this are J2EE artifacts for example. I’m not sure how ripping strength to split or tear the cloth is as relevant. That’s the theory, and the numbers seem to bear it out.

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3di patch 2 2 1 home 123

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1. Some folks get all bunged up when they see black sails, and they attribute all success to people having these sails, even when the results either suggest otherwise, or the sailors lodging complaints can barely sail upwind to begin with, so focus their efforts on personal improvement by attacking rating systems or the hardware of others.
2. This is why the Hydranet Radial “warp-oriented cloth” sail has its strength KDH – I dont have any particular ‘hate’ for North. After you determine the Oracle home to which you need to apply the patch, you should apply the patch with the opatch apply command as described in Section 2.

3. Yea, agreed, as I said, I’m sure they will be just fine.I even get the hate for Big Blue. Optional – list the Oracle homes that have been used to create or extend the WebLogic Domain at this location.

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3di patch 2 2 1 home 123

4. Find the following line:3di patch 2 2 1 home 123For a racer, maybe 1 year is what they expect anyway and this is what North is used to. But once I get home to California if I ever get home to California they will probably be on the boat all winter too.

5. If we want ultimate reliability a weave is favored. The start and stop commands allow Fusion Middleware runtime entities to be started or stopped, respectively.

6. They dont conform very well – fibers tend to get kinked – may not be a big issue with dacron but was with high mod fibers. I’ll get quotes for the North and dyneema sails.

7. They are associated with particular versions of Oracle products. I saw him in the airport with my family days later when we were flying down to the islands and even after reminding him we’d just met he made me feel I wasn’t worthy of his time.

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3di patch 2 2 1 home 123

User Reviews & Rating

8. If neither is available, the Middleware home from which the command is executed will be used. Patch ID is registered in Oracle Home inventory with proper meta-data.

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9. People that understand how you think and help you figure out how best to help you to meet your needs instead of just trying to upsell and oversell you on the latest flash upgrade.

3di patch 2 2 1 home 123

10. I think spectra in the laminate makes things even worse.

11. All have reputable Cruising products. If neither is available, then the Oracle home from which the command is executed is used.

12. The location of the patch binaries must be specified using the -ph option. The userConfigFile file contains an encrypted user name and password, while the userKeyFile contains a secret key that is used to encrypt and decrypt the user name and password.

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3di patch 2 2 1 home 123

13. BUT, this eyesore took us NM, double reefed, and still gave us 8. Clear out the inventory before the new product release!

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14. If a sail blows out I’ll motor home and ask North for a new one. They still look brand new.

Might solve the stitching failure. And of course UV covers are designed to be sacrificial, you surely can’t complain about that? My understanding of Dacron vs Hydranet is that the longevity overall is similar, but whereas Dacron stretches in a year, HN holds shape for most of its life.

It’s still too new to tell how it will last but looks good for now DP loves that people think this way. But the reality f rom DP’s own marketing literature: The resulting fabric is higher in tear strength and, combined with the strength of the ripstop, stronger over the life of the sail than any woven polyester.

Dacron shrinks when it’s heat set and spectra doesn’t, hence it’s a ripstop. Further, the Dacron can’t be properly heat set because the spectra would melt. There’s a reason WarpDrive and North Radian cloth are pure properly heat set polyester.

Some sailmakers have told me they have had bad experiences with Hydranet, “just a stretchy dacron”. Unfortunately many of the anecdotes come without enough color: DP says that the radial version of the cloth has much more Spectra or Dyneema than the cross cut.

Now there is also Contender’s version, Fibercon Pro Hybrid. Anybody have that info? Maybe I will need to do my own tests. I will agree that a laminated or glued fiber string sail should be stronger, lighter, and less stretchy.

The lighter part begins to diminish when the required additions for cruising are added up: Too heavy to pick up without a crane, so what would another 20 lbs matter? I have put a lot of effort into trying to keep these string sails from molding, unsuccessfully.

I’m not sure what options there are, but I know there is a UV coating we used to dip our stripped halyards in back when I had a race boat. For us, the consideration also is that above a certain level of loading, Dacron is going to stretch faster.

So with the size of our boat it’s not an optimal choice. With the HN Radial I know the stretch resistance is more unidirectional, where as the HN crosscut is more likely to stretch in one direction.

Just to be clear. The warp-oriented cloths are specifically designed for radial-constructed sails. To me there’s a clear benefit for shape holding to these over a cross-cut sail using standard fill-oriented Dacron.

Perversely, because of the heat-set and other issues, if the Hydranet is more stretchy than a pure-Dacron cloth it’s because of the spectra. North’s claim is consistent with this:. Radian delivers lower stretch and higher performance than any other non-laminated polyester sailcloth.

Sailors can now enjoy low-stretch radial performance without films and glues. Ddw, is 20lbs all it is between string and Dacron for your main? That is much less than I would have expected. HN Radial and HN Crosscut are actually quite different cloths, they don’t make the radial and crosscut sails with the same weaves.

I don’t actually know, as I have never had a dacron sail on it. Originally I was told the difference would be great, the problem is when you add the many weights in addition to the cloth, the weight differences in the cloth tends to get diluted.

On the string sail I needed taffeta both sides, it isn’t all that light and a pure weight addition for the string. The battens weigh the same, the stackpack weighs the same.

Trying to scale that to sq ft and none of the numbers make sense: And I’ve had North’s version: This will be my 6th season with them. Just finished a circumnavigation well in January with a radial Hydranet genoa.

Still has very good shape, draft has not moved aft significantly. I like the stuff. This is a genoa on a 40′ pretty light catamaran that regularly sails quickly in too much apparent wind. Here’s part of the data from my sail’s lot of cloth: Here’s the generic numbers for Challenge High Aspect dacron 9.

I’m not sure how much variation between these number and actual lots of cloth. As you can see the Hydranet is nothing special compared to the lab numbers for Dacron. But it sure seems to hold its shape better than any Dacron sail I’ve used.

I’ve had infrequently used dacron sails end up with a little mildew on them, but you can just lightly beach them back to white. They say not to do that with laminated. On a circumnav, or any full time cruiser, you are more likely to put the sails up somewhat regularly, and the sun can do a good job keeping them bleached and occasionally dried.

I am a commuter cruiser, sails might sit furled on the boat for two months or more. Off season I have them dried, bricked and stored. But once I get home to California if I ever get home to California they will probably be on the boat all winter too.

Hydranet Radial, tri-radial construction. The fill dimension is the width of the roll of cloth. This is why the Hydranet Radial “warp-oriented cloth” sail has its strength The Challenge cloth, from the numbers, is clearly a “fill-oriented” cloth–the strength is along the fill.

This is ok for a crosscut sail where the load path is sort-of along the fill, but much of the load is along the bias. When the resin in the sail flogs out or degrades the sail looks like shit. The shape-holding of the Hydranet sail comes from the fact that it’s a tri-radial made with an appropriate cloth–the load paths are lined up with the strength in the cloth.

A corollary from the above. The Challenge cloth along its fill dimension is stronger than the Hydranet along its warp. The spectra does nothing to reduce the Hydranet’s stretchiness.

A well made warp-oriented pure Dacron cloth would do just as well. Same use, seasonal weekends and week-long cruises. I roll up the sails when I’m done sailing, wet or not, even wet with salt water. The difference is night and day.

I think spectra in the laminate makes things even worse. Joli has the same issue. The polyester fibers end up tighter than the UHMWPE so they come into play only in ultimate strength after the shape has been sacrificed.

But importantly, like North Radian and WarpDrive, it’s a warp-oriented cloth and is well suited to radial construction, which aligns the strength of the fabric along the load paths where it’s needed.

I’m beginning to doubt that modern sail materials, especially aramid and carbon that are susceptible to bending, are practical for a cruising sail where longevity is important.

The construction method seems most relevant. From a design perspective cross-cut cloth sails are horrible for shape from very basic considerations–where the loads are and how much does the cloth resist stretch in those directions.

As mentioned previously, the Hydranet Crosscut is a fairly different product than the Radial, even though it shares a name. It’s more of a fill cloth since it is woven for corss cut construction.

It has one direction it stretches, and one direction where there is basically none. You make it sound like I’d get the same stretch on Dacron sails that I get on Hydranet Crosscut, but I’m not really buying that. Maybe it’s the weight of the cloth we’d need for our size, but the HN Crosscut looks like a much better option.

I had a lot of discussions with a friend that works for DP before we ordered the new sail. He shared some of the test numbers with me I’ll ask him if I can share his e-mail, I told him about this thread but he may not want to be drawn in between HN Radial and a radial, polyester-only cloth.

There was a significant difference in the warp-pull tests in favor of the Hydranet. The fill direction pull tests on the Hydranet Crosscut were similar to their premium bluewater cloth, which puts the HN Crosscut at a big disadvantage because it’s way more expensive.

The HN Crosscut would have cost a few hundred bucks less than a polyester radial sail. BJ, that of course would be the relevant test. Which warp-oriented polyester-only cloth did you consider?

And you have informed me that HN is heat set, so What we need someone to do, is test these materials to destruction to see what the curves really look like. The fabric companies probably know the answer to this, but may have reasons for not publishing the knowledge.

I’m surprised at how little information there is. It seems the marketing approach is to appeal to mystique. I think it’s interesting that both with North Radian and now with 3Di NORDAC North are willing to backtrack and be plain with the idea that polyester with thoughtful construction methods is the way to go for the cruising sailor.

I respect the courage to convey and offer products based on what they’ve learned even though it’s in conflict with their own history. If someone called Tom Davis at North Mildford, and sweet talked him: He had a ton of comparative data, and if did not have exactly what you were looking for, could easily get it.

He’s a good guy. But which of us is right does not really matter. Tom got back to me when Evans referred him to me when I had some questions about my North Radian sails. Dan Neri is the other terrific source at North I think in Newport these days.

He was responsible for Minden manufacturing and 3dl, then led the transition to 3di, and is now I believe leading their worldwide manufacturing integration. Dacron 3DI explains why the local North reps have been flogging their radial dacron for totally inappropriate applications recently.

Clear out the inventory before the new product release! I’m not sure how ripping strength to split or tear the cloth is as relevant. I suspect most sailcloth tears are a result of age and degradation rather than destruction of new cloth during normal use.

I think the big difference between Polyester Dacron and 3Di Nordac is the fiber crimp and the load alignment. You straighten the warp fiber which leaves the fill seriously crimped and vice versa.

The heavier the weight of cloth the more crimp as the fibers are bigger. Which one is better depends on your application. A balanced fabric with a soft finish is very hard to tear but wont hold its shape very well.

Radial sails are far superior to crosscut but come at an added cost, not only more expensive fabric but more labour and more cloth wastage. Cross cut is VERY economical to make, very little cloth wastage and labour.

Works ok for low load mainsails with full battens but for anything that needs to actually hold its shape its very compromised. Sure while the resin is still holding it together its OK but once the resin softens after a year or 2 then the bias diagonal structure has essentially disappeared completely.

Crosscut dacron will always have its place in the market but cant be compared to any radial sail. Testing fabric is also hard to gain acurate results. Pull that same test sample at a bias angle of 45 dgrees and you will get a much different result!

In laminates the mylar essentially takes the place of the resin. It does a good job of this for a while but when it starts to fail its usually quite spectacular My preference would actually be radial dacron over polyester cruise laminates for cruising boats under 50ft these days.

The performance is very similar but without the downsides of delam and mildew which plauge cruise laminates. Once you get into the bigger boats you really need to start adding more high modulus fibers to keep the sail weight manageable which you just cant really do well with woven fabric which is where laminates or composite sails come back in.

Now 3Di Nordac is a composite not a laminate. Resin and fiber filaments only, not glue mylar and yarn. No Crimp, no mylar, no delam, no mildew just fiber in its purest form. I believe once these are available on the market soon i believe you might be very surprised by the affordability I have actually myself been using 3Di nordac for quite some time now after been given a set to test on the Sun fast After nm of racing and cruising including the Round North Island 2 handed race the shape has not moved at all and the sails were fast as hell.

They still look brand new. I was actually quite staggered at how good they were. Also worth noting that I tested out one of the very first 3Di mainsails back in on my racing catamaran. Its still going strong.

Apparently optimists lead happy if delusional lives. I can think of a number of reasons for not publishing data. Protecting intellectual property, protecting the market for inferior products. I even get the hate for Big Blue. When my former North sales guy met me in Southwest Harbor when I was taking delivery of my boat I questioned to myself why he was there.

He made a comment about the boat being “shiny when they’re brand new,” but he didn’t know anything that others there didn’t know. I saw him in the airport with my family days later when we were flying down to the islands and even after reminding him we’d just met he made me feel I wasn’t worthy of his time.

But hey, there are plenty of douches in the world, and clearly I wasn’t one of their grand prix bread and butter clients. More generally, there doesn’t seem to be much respect for the people who write the checks in sailing.

I can’t imagine why anyone wants to do so for the big racing programs. Depends on the loft you deal with. The primary reason for my years long relationship with Quantum was the service level delivered there. As a racer, I was often buying a few new sails year, I estimate I bought well over dozen sails from that the loft.

I wasn’t a Grand Prix program at all, but I was still writing a five figure check most years. The first year with my A few years later, we invited him to Block Island Race Week with us, and he sailed with us throughout the season to build the team; we had a lot of fun.

But more important, I could show up on Thursday morning with a sail I screwed up the night before racing, and have it back in time for a weekend regatta. Things were turned around fast and prioritized because he got what I was doing, and even once I started cruising and sold the race boat the same level of service and trust was there ordering and servicing sails for the new boat.

That relationship was a bummer to leave behind, just like my rigger. People that understand how you think and help you figure out how best to help you to meet your needs instead of just trying to upsell and oversell you on the latest flash upgrade.

As I wrote a bit up thread – the thing I am most interested in is how North will price dacron 3di – do you know, can you tell us – say compared to a similar speced dpi norlam sail – or say the actual price for a norlam and a 3di dacron for your sunfast retail pricing, not beta test pricing??

By the way, testing woven and laminated flat goods is not difficult. You actually always publish 6 numbers 0, 45 and 90 axis pull, fresh and fluttered. That essentially gives you all you need to know to compare two similar products.

However all this is easy to do. It is automated and North has the correct machinery. It would be lovely if you would help us get North to provide valuable data for customer decision making – pick up the phone and call Tom and Dan and tell them we are good guys just trying to get some hard data to understand our sail options better.

Now testing 3di and 3dl is rather more difficult. Because the fiber layout is ‘custom’. So you have no ‘standard’ measurement. It still can be done but there is a lot more room for fudging the results either intentionally or unintentionally.

As to reliability – my experience with 3di suggests the failure mode has been and is going to be rather different than prior sail constructions. In prior constructions you basically had ‘aging’; some fast, and some slow – depending on specific fabric, environmental conditions and user handling.

With 3di you have much more ‘QA failures’ and ‘infant mortality’, and then much slower aging. The aging factor will depend a lot on the specific fiber mix. It is the real world net of those factors that determines the ‘success’ of the trade-offs.

For 3dl it did not work out so well for cruisers even after north said it was production ready and reliable in the racing world. KDH – I dont have any particular ‘hate’ for North. I had also had terrific customer relationships with doyle they made me some truly excellent ‘cruising’ code zeros where North had a cloth gap in their product line and with Quantum’s special projects group.

Evans, I wasn’t thinking of you at all with the North “hate. These fibers are all pretty elastic. So whoever said that was blowing smoke up your skirt. Also flutter and accelerated age testing can and should be done, it is common in other industries.

I understand the crimp thing, and Hydranet and Fibercon products which are warp oriented claim to have low or no crimp in the warp. I also agree that the big difference may be radial construction, especially on a modern planform – surely crosscut cannot possibly do a good job of fiber stress alignment.

The questions remain – does the PE content in these hybrid cloths carry any load, all the load, or some of the load when certain stretch levels are reached?

Or is it simply a marketing gimmick? Sailing is rife with marketing gimmicks I’m actually quite surprised someone hasn’t introduced plain crosscut dacron sails with printing on them making them look like carbon string sails. There is a market for these I’m sure.

As they reportedly used to say at Carrol marine, just paint it black and the customer will think it’s carbon – they don’t know the difference. Now onto 3Di Dacron: It has been stated that they do not mold or mildew.

I can easily collect 10 gallons of water in my main sitting in the cradle. It may sit there for months. Even with no glues to feed the biomass, there will be growth. Also, how is a repair done on these at sea or in 3rd world port?

Let’s say the batten pocket starts to come loose, or the batten retaining straps get damaged as happened to me just last season. I understood you cannot sew through them? If you can sew through them, should North add one additional process step, and punch pinholes every 2 inches or so to let them drain and dry?

For a racer, maybe 1 year is what they expect anyway and this is what North is used to. I may be miles offshore and don’t have a car. And still they mildew. Like Trump, they believe what they say, and don’t know they are lying.

Evans has it exactly right that most sailmakers do not understand the cruising sailer and cruising market. Most of them have never been cruising. They understand racing and daysailing. OK that was a bit of a rambling rant but I do feel better.

The 3di nordac main was the same price as the radian one. I have a Ranger 26 and the main is pretty small. We decided to stick with the Radian for it. You need to be a member in order to leave a comment.

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Posted May 17, Share this post Link to post Share on other sites. That’s kind of a non-sequitor though, as these sails are targeted at cruisers, not racer. From the North site: Dacron is quite UV resistant, and the “tapes” are themselves Dacron.

No need for taffeta. This is just a 3Di made with Dacron. Posted May 18, Ajax, With a woven dacron sail you lose shape due to two main mechanisms. E- Thanks for the explanation of how Dacron degrades.

When I read this in an article quoted from someone at North my bullshit meter registered a bit: I guess the “catalyst” is heat. I suppose taffeta would be used to protect the glue, not the Dacron. The java , ar , cp , and make commands must be available in one of the directories listed in the PATH environment variable.

The commands are not available for all platforms. If a backup does not exist, you may have to reinstall the software. If Oracle Support is not able to resolve the issue, they may ask to see if you have any patches already installed on your system.

To determine this information, you should run the opatch lsinventory command. To check if a particular patch is installed in the Oracle home or the set of Oracle homes within a Middleware home you use the opatch checkInstalledOneOffs command.

Upon determining that you are in need of a new patch and it has not already been installed on your system, you should do the following:. Make certain that you have the latest version of OPatch, as described in Section 2.

Once you obtain the patch, determine the Oracle home directory to which you are going to apply the patch. The most common type of patch available in a Fusion Middleware environment involves patching a specific Oracle home directory.

Some patches for example, a patch pertaining to JRF may apply to multiple Oracle home directories within a specific Middleware home. If you do not know the name of your Oracle home, you should run the opatch lshomes command as described in Section 2.

After you determine your Oracle home, you should run the opatch checkApplicable command as described in Section 2. As the Middleware home is the top-level entity in a Fusion Middleware topology, the location of your Middleware home will be required for many of the OPatch commands in a Fusion Middleware environment.

This file contains important information and instructions that must be followed prior to applying your patch. After you determine the Oracle home to which you need to apply the patch, you should apply the patch with the opatch apply command as described in Section 2.

In most cases, after you apply the patch the instructions in the README file will tell you to run the opatch start command to re-start your servers. After the patching is complete and your servers are restarted, you should check your product software to verify that the issue has been resolved.

If for some reason the result is not satisfactory, you can use the opatch rollback command to remove the patch from the Oracle home. Many Fusion Middleware artifacts are deployed to a runtime environment, where applications pick up these binaries for execution.

A common example of this are J2EE artifacts for example,. Patching in a Fusion Middleware environment involves updating and replacing these artifacts in the Oracle home.

The servers to which the artifacts are deployed need to be restarted for the changes to take effect. After the artifacts are deployed, there are various staging modes that affect how WebLogic Server treats these artifacts, which in turn determine how the applications are patched.

All artifacts in Oracle Fusion Middleware 11 g Release 1 If a J2EE application is deployed to three Managed Servers within a cluster, each Managed Server must be able to access the same application archive files from a shared or network-mounted directory in order to deploy the new J2EE application.

If multiple Managed Servers on multiple machines are used, the path to the application bits must be the same on all machines because there is a single point of entry for the application in the domain configuration.

The process to patch in a distributed environment depends on whether or not your Middleware home directory is shared or not shared. Consider the environment shown in Figure This is a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, each with its own local Middleware home and Fusion Middleware products inside the Middleware home:.

This is also a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, but the Middleware home on “Middleware Host 2” is shared or NFS mounted:. Below is the syntax for the OPatch utility:.

Acceptable values for command are described in Table Valid options for each command are described in the sections that describe each command. For details, see Section 2. The apply command in a Fusion Middleware environment applies the patch to the Oracle home on the local machine.

Sensitive information such as Administration Server credentials, and other important information such as the Administration Server URL, domain location and applications directory location, are obtained by prompts from the console.

In some cases, default values may be found and specified by OPatch; in these cases, press Enter to use these default values. Automation applications such as Grid Control may invoke OPatch with the -silent option, which does not prompt for any input from the console.

For Fusion Middleware components, userConfigFile and userKeyFile can be specified in the property file as keys with corresponding file names. The userConfigFile file contains an encrypted user name and password, while the userKeyFile contains a secret key that is used to encrypt and decrypt the user name and password.

Some patches are certified by Oracle Product Support as capable of being used with the -auto option, which can automate certain portions of your patching procedure. The -auto option applies the patch to the Oracle home; verifies that the patch is actually applied, then performs any necessary redeploy operations against the specified WebLogic Domain, including stopping and starting all the servers that are affected by the patch.

Beginning with OPatch release In order for OPatch to be used properly:. If the Managed Servers are up and running, OPatch will stop the servers, apply the patch, then restart the servers.

If the Managed Servers are not running, OPatch will apply the patch but then you must manually start the servers in order to see the effects of the patch. The -auto option should be used in conjunction with the -domain option; the only exception is if only one WebLogic Domain was configured from the Oracle home.

In such cases, OPatch will use that domain as the default domain. If multiple domains have been created and the -domain option is not used, then it is the user’s responsibility to run opatch deploy to redeploy the patched artifacts to their respective domains, and also stop and start the affected servers in each of the domains.

The apply command with the -auto option specified performs the following:. A summary of the options for the apply command are described in Table If -auto is used then -domain must also be used to indicate the name of the domain in which the rollout should occur; the exception is when there is only one domain configured out of the Oracle home, in which case the -domain flag is optional.

Optional – The Middleware home to which the patch will be applied. If neither is specified, then the Middleware home from where the command is run will be used. Optional – This option is used to specify the Oracle home to which the patch should be applied.

If neither is specified, OPatch will apply the updates to the Oracle home from which it was launched. Optional – print out the actions that will be taken by executing the command, but does not actually execute the command.

The rollback command allows you to remove an existing one-off patch by specifying the unique patch ID. The rollback command with the -auto option specified performs the following:. A summary of the options for the rollback command are described in Table Use the -lsinventory option to display all applied patch IDs.

Each one-off patch is uniquely identified by an ID. To rollback to a previous patch version, that patch version’s ID must be supplied. Refer to Section 2. The location of the patch binaries must be specified using the -ph option.

If the patch is installed in the current Oracle home the Oracle home from which you are running this command then the -ph option is not required. If the patch is already applied to the Oracle home, the -id option can be used to specify the patch you want to use for deployment.

A summary of the options for the deploy command are described in Table The absolute path to the location of the patch. If none is specified, then the current directory is used.

The lshomes command lists all the Oracle homes pertaining to logical entities such as Host or Domain. For a Host, the list of Oracle homes is obtained from the machine’s central inventory.

For a WebLogic domain, the list of homes is limited to product Oracle homes that are installed within a top-level Middleware home. If the -domain or -domaindir option is used, the command lists the Oracle homes that have been used to create or extend the WebLogic domain.

If not, all the homes registered with the machine’s central inventory or the inventory location specified using -invPtrLoc are listed. When the Middleware home is specified and the -domain or -domaindir option is not specified, this command will list all the Oracle homes within the Middleware home that are registered with the machine’s central inventory or the specified inventory location.

A summary of the options for the lshomes command are described in Table Optional – list the Oracle homes that have been used to create or extend the WebLogic Domain at this location.

Optional – list only the Oracle homes registered with the machine’s central inventory that are located in this Middleware home. If neither is available, the Middleware home from which the command is executed will be used.

Optional – absolute path to the location of your oraInst. The lsdomains command lists all the WebLogic Domains that have been created from a certain Oracle home:. If the Oracle home is specified, then only those domains created from the specified Oracle home are listed.

If neither is available, then OPatch will use the Oracle home directory from which the command is run. If a Middleware home is specified, all domains created from all Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home are listed.

A summary of the options for the lsdomains command are described in Table This checkApplicable command produces a list of Oracle homes to which the patch can be applied. For Fusion Middleware, this command is limited in scope to the top-level Middleware home:.

If only the Middleware home is specified, OPatch will check to see whether or not this patch can be applied to all Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home.

If an Oracle home is specified in addition to the Middleware home, OPatch will check to see if the patch can be applied to the specified Oracle home in the specified Middleware home. A summary of the options for the checkApplicable command are described in Table Optional – location of the patch for which you want to run the checkApplicable command.

If not specified, then the patch in the current directory is used. The checkInstalledOneOffs command checks to see if the specified patch or patches have been applied to certain Oracle homes or WebLogic Domains:.

If a Middleware home is specified, OPatch checks all the Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home that are registered with the machine’s central inventory. A summary of the options for the checkInstalledOneOffs command are described in Table ID of the patch or patches that you want to check.

Separate multiple patch IDs with a comma , character. The start and stop commands allow Fusion Middleware runtime entities to be started or stopped, respectively. Only entities of the same type can be started or stopped; if you need to start or stop entities of multiple types, you must run this command separately for each entity type.

A summary of the options for the start and stop commands are described in Table The name of the WebLogic or Fusion Middleware entity you want to start or stop. Only entities of the same type can be specified; multiple entities should be separated by a comma.

The fmwContainer option starts or stops the container for example, the WebLogic Server hosting the application. The fmwServer option starts or stops the actual java process that is running for example, a Managed Server. Optional – the absolute path to the Oracle home directory.

If neither is available, then the Oracle home from which the command is executed is used. This section describes common issues you may encounter when running the OPatch utility in a Fusion Middleware environment.

The machine name of the Administration Server and Managed Servers must be set to a valid value.

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I have actually myself been using 3Di nordac for quite some time now after been given a set to test on the Sun fast I dont remember in the variable cost how much was fiber cost – but when you look at the total process, for most of it, it does not matter to the costs if you are running high mod fibers or Dacron thru it. A summary of the options for the checkApplicable command are described in Table The gennaker fabric is bog standard – and I would guess the sailmaker really wanted to make it from. The resulting fabric is higher in tear strength and, combined with the strength of the ripstop, stronger over the life of the sail than any woven polyester.I had it happen to one of my mainsails about miles from Hawaii – we sailed in with a huge hole in the middle of the sail, but the strings were actually keeping sort of decent shape across the rest of the sail. The syntax for the lsdomains command is shown below:

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By AjaxMay 17, in Cruising Anarchy. Based on quotes that I’ve gotten from North for Dacron sails vs their other technologies and those of competitors, North Dacron panelled sails were generally in the same ballpark as laminate sails from other manufacturers.

That said, I would want to see of these sails provide the same kind of bullet proof reliability as traditional panel sails with woven dacron. I am a big fan of home sail technology, and I largely think that Dacron ends up being more expensive than better technologies if you really care about shape holding over time.

That said, laminates have intrinsic life span issues built in glue oxidation in particular, and film breakdownand I’m guessing that the oxidation issue would be present with this new technology, as the fibers are presumably held in place with glue.

At the end of the day, this definitely looks like a win for shape holding, though I’m skeptical that those thinking that they will all of a sudden have access to molded technology at a reduced cost because their sails are white will be disappointed, as the materials cost shouldn’t amount to a huge difference unless comparing to carbon fiber.

As an interesting side argument for this technology. The organizers of some classic yachts events have been wringing their hands about the use of modern sails in these events.

Some folks get all bunged up when they see black sails, and they attribute all success to people having these sails, even when the results either suggest otherwise, or the sailors lodging complaints can barely sail upwind to begin with, so focus their efforts on personal improvement by attacking rating systems or the hardware of others.

Given that these sails are made of Dacron, which for some reason is seen as a natural fiber by this bozos, I would see this as a great way to appease the classic 3di dilettantes, and not throw money away by purchasing woven racing sails that lose their shape a quarter of the way through the season.

I feel that he set the bar pretty high for North- A cost comparable to Dacron, a long service life and durability and racing sail performance. I need a new main anyway, so I’m very curious about this.

Regarding the short shape-holding time of Dacron- I feel that it depends on how you treat them. I think you can get a lot more than half a season out of them. I get what you’re saying completely.

As a racer, I obviously appreciate reliable sail shape. I also really enjoy this as a cruiser too. I have a new main coming this season after having to go last season with my very old North dacron main. I had to do this because my previous main, a Cuben Fiber sail basically failed instantaneously.

That sail, up to that point had a terrific flying shape. I am still grateful to have an old blown out dacron sail that is essentially indestructible, but sailing with it vs my cuben sail is a completely different experience, particularly in light air and close hauled in any breeze.

My feeling is that the cruising benefits of good sail shape are largely underappreciated within the cruising community. As someone who straddles the line between the two communities, I totally appreciate good sail shape.

That’s always been my gripe with high tech sails- The “failure mode. Of course, the failure mode of Dacron is very insidious. It’s slow and escapes your notice until you finally look up one day and say “Wow, that looks terrible!

No wonder I can’t get upwind! He said, “These sails just get lumpy. It 3di be much more useful if it gave some clearer comparison with other technologies. It says ” 3Di NORDAC marries patented 3Di shape holding technology with the toughness and affordability of polyester sails “, which kinda implies that it holds shape as well as a3Di sails.

It’s probably decent, but not as stiff overall as carbon, aramid or dyneema materials. The fact that the yarns are now truly oriented along predicted load paths will go a very long way towards shape holding, home likely be a dramatic improvement on dacron sails.

All of that said, I still stand by my original point that you should not expect these sails to be bulletproof like woven dacron sails, as they are now essentially polyester laminates all relying on the same glues that eventually suffer in a catastrophic failure mode.

On the other hand, you should expect many more seasons of decent sail shape than you would with a woven sail, particularly if you opt to go with full battens.

The sails tended to last two summers for racing and two more for beer can. These sails will probably perform like those. The main technological advance is that the Nordac sails will be both lighter and seam free.

They also might gain some benefit from a layer of taffeta protecting the tapes from UV damage. I don’t know the exact proposed layup. They are composed of ultra-thin unidirectional spread filament tapes, pre-impregnated 123 thermoset adhesive, arranged in a complex multiple-axis array, and three-dimensionally molded into a patch, flexible composite membrane.

With a woven dacron sail you lose shape due to two main mechanisms. Tapes with unidirectional fibers are laid in orientations chosen by the sail designer. This ‘should be’ more resistant to the first sort of deformation if the designer gets it correct, but the off axis loads can still deform 3di if the designer does not get the fibers oriented correctly.

I presume in an ‘inexpensive’ dacron 3di inexpensive compared to other north products there will be less designer time built in – with computer layout that will probably not hurt the fiber orientation too much – but I would expect there will be some learning curve, especially around details like reef points.

In a dacron mylar laminate, the mylar itself prevents off-axis deformantion – in 3di it will be a combination of the tape layout and the adhesive see comments about adhesive below. The fundamental dacron fiber stretch on axis should be similar to woven sails – particularly to the radial cut ones.

It will not change. Woven sails will survive as ‘functional white triangles’ for a long long time even with impaired shape – 15 or 20 years in many cases. North does NOT have a lot of experience with the ultimate lifespan of this adhesive in the 10’s of years range there will be fatigue and environmental issues they really have not experienced much yetas most of their 3di’s to date have been racing sails with relatively short lifespans 3 years would be a pretty long racing sail life span.

This may not be a concern if you plan to replace sails on say a 5 year time horizon, but could be if you ‘expect’ 10 or 15 years from ‘dacron’ sails. North had adhesive and tape layout ‘issues’ when they first launched 3DI, and I would sort of expect them to go thru similar teething issues with dacron tapes but these teething issues will take longer to play out.

I might note that 3di’s do in fact have seams. Their panels are laid up on flat tables, broad seamed, and then glued together on the mold. Evans, you mentioned the adhesives I also assume there are adhesives impregnated in the fibres themselves like 3Dl and 3Di??

Is there any kind of encapsulating film to hold everything together? My stepfather has a 15 year old tri-radial Pentax AP 1 on a Tartan built by Quantum, and I will admit the shape is as round as the moon, but the glued broadseams and the sail itself are still intact.

That sail probably saw 6 or 7 seasons of hard racing, and probably 5 races in the last 7 years. How is the glue looking on this North sail? How many more seasons can I get out of it? A loft blessed this for the crossing, but I woke up for my watch one day and saw this sickening sight.

The crew doesn’t know what happened. BUT, this eyesore took us NM, double reefed, and still gave us 8. I think it’s time to retire it. Originally we were going to get the radian but the price wasn’t that much difference We also got a pretty nice discount for being willing to be a test subject, well kinda.

For us it looks to be a perfect match. I’m not really sure I can answer too many questions on them until I get my hands on it. That mildew in above is the reason I’ll never get a laminate sail home. Looks like shit and there’s no effective way to prevent it.

Does anyone know how the “thermoset adhesive” differs from the glue used in laminate sails? North’s marketing claim suggests we should think of the glue the same way we think of resins used in hull laminates. We don’t worry about hull failure through resins breaking down, at least if there were no glaring problems with construction.

Thanks for patch explanation of how Dacron degrades. I was hoping for 10 years of careful use out of this new type of sail. I’m not necessarily going to wait for a 10 year test sample before I buy one but I don’t think I’ll be a first-adopter either.

I’m glad that ordkhntr is our test subject! It is a capital intensive process. The tape laying machines in particular are quite slow. I am sort of guessing that North has excess capacity atm.

KDH, you do need to take North’s “marketing claims” with a large dose of salt. They are notorious for ‘stretching the truth”. Do you remember back in the 3DL hayday when North claimed a sail would be no good unless it had corner to corner continuous fibers – and that whole point just instantly disappeared from their marketing when 123 rolled out 3di because it does not use continuous fibers.

And their claim of “seamless” is just a plain fib – it has seams – way fewer than a paneled woven sail but still has them. Your glue question is a bit complex, because there are several quite different glue systems in use in laminate sails.

But north’s claim is a bit BS – In boat construction you mostly use 2 part adhesives that chemically change both polyester and epoxy do when they cure. That is what happened to a generation of 3dl sails – the thermoset adhesive had too low a temp set point and it would uncure in the tropics.

So it is a design balance. I had it happen to one of my mainsails about miles from Hawaii – we sailed in with a huge hole in the middle of the sail, but the strings were actually keeping sort of decent shape across the rest of patch sail.

Evans, the glue issues as you describe them are thought-worthy. I guess “a laminate without the mylar” is not hugely far off. When I read this in an article quoted from someone at North my bullshit meter registered a bit:.

Same old line from big blue. Its not seamless and 123 a laminate sail. If you are a cruiser and want a durable proven product Dacron is the way to go. We still don’t know whether the so called 3di thermoset adhesive ” can handle long term UV exposure.

It might well turn brittle and start to fracture as well as lose contact with the fibers. Based on what we know so far this type of sail seems best suited to day sailors and club racers.

It might be best for any cruiser buying this type of sail to request the addition of taffeta, if only to extend the sail’s lifespan. Obviously a mechanical weave is the “belt and suspenders” approach but when any stiffening resin used fails it’s highly susceptible to shape issues.

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That would be fun. I agree, that would be fun. If he used the cutters somewhat evenly, I would be really curious to see how various options aged. Yea, agreed, as I said, I’m sure they will be just fine.

A four identical boat test with different sails would be very instructive and fun. Not sure I can sell that idea. Let’s wait and see how the first set works out. Anyone else tried a Hydranet sail?

Anyone on a square head? About half the people I talk to think the material is great, the other half crap. I have found a way to prevent it: It isn’t a practical solution except on a dinghy. We did that with our racing 3dl sails.

Our no4, which had been up less than 5 times, essentially aged in the bag. Hoist number 6 of its life saw plastic confetti blowing downwind. Why do a test on one brand?

Why not one Doyle, one Quantum and one Hood as well. All have reputable Cruising products. Hydranet, as a weave made from spun yarns, will have much more stretch than even a Dacron 3Di, which is made with filaments.

The spinning and weaving build in a lot of stretch. I think Dacron is a bit stretchy once you get to larger boats though, which is why we’ve been using Hydranet.

We put a Hydranet Crosscut main and Genoa on our boat. The Main is ten years old and has taken us from New England to Australia over the last five years. We take delivery of a Hydranet Radial main in June sometime. The Geno is six years old and has more life in it still.

The crosscut clot is supposed to be stretchier than the radial, and our main has gotten more full. We could have recut it and got quotes to do so, but with the upwind sailing we may be doing in the next years we didn’t want to depend on that.

We’ve been very happy with the sails so far. Our biggest problem with the main outside of unavoidable stretching over time was the stupid threads and webbing holding the clew on getting eaten by UV.

We ripped that off once leaving Trinidad threads and on the way to Bora Bora from Tahiti webbing. And the UV covers on the edges have worn more quickly than the sail and needed replacing.

Hydranet has aramid fibers woven into it, not just spun. It took ten years and a lot of ocean miles to stretch our main to the point it annoyed me. And HN crosscut is stretchier than HN radial. Might solve the stitching failure.

And of course UV covers are designed to be sacrificial, you surely can’t complain about that? My understanding of Dacron vs Hydranet is that the longevity overall is similar, but whereas Dacron stretches in a year, HN holds shape for most of its life.

It’s still too new to tell how it will last but looks good for now DP loves that people think this way. But the reality f rom DP’s own marketing literature: The resulting fabric is higher in tear strength and, combined with the strength of the ripstop, stronger over the life of the sail than any woven polyester.

Dacron shrinks when it’s heat set and spectra doesn’t, hence it’s a ripstop. Further, the Dacron can’t be properly heat set because the spectra would melt. There’s a reason WarpDrive and North Radian cloth are pure properly heat set polyester.

Some sailmakers have told me they have had bad experiences with Hydranet, “just a stretchy dacron”. Unfortunately many of the anecdotes come without enough color: DP says that the radial version of the cloth has much more Spectra or Dyneema than the cross cut.

Now there is also Contender’s version, Fibercon Pro Hybrid. Anybody have that info? Maybe I will need to do my own tests. I will agree that a laminated or glued fiber string sail should be stronger, lighter, and less stretchy.

The lighter part begins to diminish when the required additions for cruising are added up: Too heavy to pick up without a crane, so what would another 20 lbs matter? I have put a lot of effort into trying to keep these string sails from molding, unsuccessfully.

I’m not sure what options there are, but I know there is a UV coating we used to dip our stripped halyards in back when I had a race boat. For us, the consideration also is that above a certain level of loading, Dacron is going to stretch faster.

So with the size of our boat it’s not an optimal choice. With the HN Radial I know the stretch resistance is more unidirectional, where as the HN crosscut is more likely to stretch in one direction. Just to be clear.

The warp-oriented cloths are specifically designed for radial-constructed sails. To me there’s a clear benefit for shape holding to these over a cross-cut sail using standard fill-oriented Dacron. Perversely, because of the heat-set and other issues, if the Hydranet is more stretchy than a pure-Dacron cloth it’s because of the spectra.

North’s claim is consistent with this:. Radian delivers lower stretch and higher performance than any other non-laminated polyester sailcloth. Sailors can now enjoy low-stretch radial performance without films and glues.

Ddw, is 20lbs all it is between string and Dacron for your main? That is much less than I would have expected. HN Radial and HN Crosscut are actually quite different cloths, they don’t make the radial and crosscut sails with the same weaves.

I don’t actually know, as I have never had a dacron sail on it. Originally I was told the difference would be great, the problem is when you add the many weights in addition to the cloth, the weight differences in the cloth tends to get diluted.

On the string sail I needed taffeta both sides, it isn’t all that light and a pure weight addition for the string. The battens weigh the same, the stackpack weighs the same. Trying to scale that to sq ft and none of the numbers make sense: And I’ve had North’s version: This will be my 6th season with them.

Just finished a circumnavigation well in January with a radial Hydranet genoa. Still has very good shape, draft has not moved aft significantly. I like the stuff. This is a genoa on a 40′ pretty light catamaran that regularly sails quickly in too much apparent wind.

Here’s part of the data from my sail’s lot of cloth: Here’s the generic numbers for Challenge High Aspect dacron 9. I’m not sure how much variation between these number and actual lots of cloth.

As you can see the Hydranet is nothing special compared to the lab numbers for Dacron. But it sure seems to hold its shape better than any Dacron sail I’ve used. I’ve had infrequently used dacron sails end up with a little mildew on them, but you can just lightly beach them back to white.

They say not to do that with laminated. On a circumnav, or any full time cruiser, you are more likely to put the sails up somewhat regularly, and the sun can do a good job keeping them bleached and occasionally dried.

I am a commuter cruiser, sails might sit furled on the boat for two months or more. Off season I have them dried, bricked and stored. But once I get home to California if I ever get home to California they will probably be on the boat all winter too.

Hydranet Radial, tri-radial construction. The fill dimension is the width of the roll of cloth. This is why the Hydranet Radial “warp-oriented cloth” sail has its strength The Challenge cloth, from the numbers, is clearly a “fill-oriented” cloth–the strength is along the fill.

This is ok for a crosscut sail where the load path is sort-of along the fill, but much of the load is along the bias. When the resin in the sail flogs out or degrades the sail looks like shit.

The shape-holding of the Hydranet sail comes from the fact that it’s a tri-radial made with an appropriate cloth–the load paths are lined up with the strength in the cloth. A corollary from the above.

The Challenge cloth along its fill dimension is stronger than the Hydranet along its warp. The spectra does nothing to reduce the Hydranet’s stretchiness. A well made warp-oriented pure Dacron cloth would do just as well.

Same use, seasonal weekends and week-long cruises. I roll up the sails when I’m done sailing, wet or not, even wet with salt water. The difference is night and day. I think spectra in the laminate makes things even worse.

Joli has the same issue. The polyester fibers end up tighter than the UHMWPE so they come into play only in ultimate strength after the shape has been sacrificed. But importantly, like North Radian and WarpDrive, it’s a warp-oriented cloth and is well suited to radial construction, which aligns the strength of the fabric along the load paths where it’s needed.

I’m beginning to doubt that modern sail materials, especially aramid and carbon that are susceptible to bending, are practical for a cruising sail where longevity is important. The construction method seems most relevant.

From a design perspective cross-cut cloth sails are horrible for shape from very basic considerations–where the loads are and how much does the cloth resist stretch in those directions. As mentioned previously, the Hydranet Crosscut is a fairly different product than the Radial, even though it shares a name.

It’s more of a fill cloth since it is woven for corss cut construction. It has one direction it stretches, and one direction where there is basically none. You make it sound like I’d get the same stretch on Dacron sails that I get on Hydranet Crosscut, but I’m not really buying that.

Maybe it’s the weight of the cloth we’d need for our size, but the HN Crosscut looks like a much better option. I had a lot of discussions with a friend that works for DP before we ordered the new sail.

He shared some of the test numbers with me I’ll ask him if I can share his e-mail, I told him about this thread but he may not want to be drawn in between HN Radial and a radial, polyester-only cloth. There was a significant difference in the warp-pull tests in favor of the Hydranet.

The fill direction pull tests on the Hydranet Crosscut were similar to their premium bluewater cloth, which puts the HN Crosscut at a big disadvantage because it’s way more expensive. The HN Crosscut would have cost a few hundred bucks less than a polyester radial sail.

BJ, that of course would be the relevant test. Which warp-oriented polyester-only cloth did you consider? And you have informed me that HN is heat set, so What we need someone to do, is test these materials to destruction to see what the curves really look like.

The fabric companies probably know the answer to this, but may have reasons for not publishing the knowledge. I’m surprised at how little information there is. It seems the marketing approach is to appeal to mystique.

I think it’s interesting that both with North Radian and now with 3Di NORDAC North are willing to backtrack and be plain with the idea that polyester with thoughtful construction methods is the way to go for the cruising sailor.

I respect the courage to convey and offer products based on what they’ve learned even though it’s in conflict with their own history. If someone called Tom Davis at North Mildford, and sweet talked him: He had a ton of comparative data, and if did not have exactly what you were looking for, could easily get it.

He’s a good guy. But which of us is right does not really matter. Tom got back to me when Evans referred him to me when I had some questions about my North Radian sails. Dan Neri is the other terrific source at North I think in Newport these days.

He was responsible for Minden manufacturing and 3dl, then led the transition to 3di, and is now I believe leading their worldwide manufacturing integration. Dacron 3DI explains why the local North reps have been flogging their radial dacron for totally inappropriate applications recently.

Clear out the inventory before the new product release! I’m not sure how ripping strength to split or tear the cloth is as relevant. I suspect most sailcloth tears are a result of age and degradation rather than destruction of new cloth during normal use.

I think the big difference between Polyester Dacron and 3Di Nordac is the fiber crimp and the load alignment. You straighten the warp fiber which leaves the fill seriously crimped and vice versa.

The heavier the weight of cloth the more crimp as the fibers are bigger. Which one is better depends on your application. A balanced fabric with a soft finish is very hard to tear but wont hold its shape very well.

Radial sails are far superior to crosscut but come at an added cost, not only more expensive fabric but more labour and more cloth wastage. Cross cut is VERY economical to make, very little cloth wastage and labour.

Works ok for low load mainsails with full battens but for anything that needs to actually hold its shape its very compromised. Sure while the resin is still holding it together its OK but once the resin softens after a year or 2 then the bias diagonal structure has essentially disappeared completely.

Crosscut dacron will always have its place in the market but cant be compared to any radial sail. Testing fabric is also hard to gain acurate results. Pull that same test sample at a bias angle of 45 dgrees and you will get a much different result!

In laminates the mylar essentially takes the place of the resin. It does a good job of this for a while but when it starts to fail its usually quite spectacular My preference would actually be radial dacron over polyester cruise laminates for cruising boats under 50ft these days.

The performance is very similar but without the downsides of delam and mildew which plauge cruise laminates. Once you get into the bigger boats you really need to start adding more high modulus fibers to keep the sail weight manageable which you just cant really do well with woven fabric which is where laminates or composite sails come back in.

Now 3Di Nordac is a composite not a laminate. Resin and fiber filaments only, not glue mylar and yarn. No Crimp, no mylar, no delam, no mildew just fiber in its purest form. I believe once these are available on the market soon i believe you might be very surprised by the affordability I have actually myself been using 3Di nordac for quite some time now after been given a set to test on the Sun fast After nm of racing and cruising including the Round North Island 2 handed race the shape has not moved at all and the sails were fast as hell.

They still look brand new. I was actually quite staggered at how good they were. Also worth noting that I tested out one of the very first 3Di mainsails back in on my racing catamaran. Its still going strong.

Apparently optimists lead happy if delusional lives. I can think of a number of reasons for not publishing data. Protecting intellectual property, protecting the market for inferior products. I even get the hate for Big Blue.

When my former North sales guy met me in Southwest Harbor when I was taking delivery of my boat I questioned to myself why he was there. He made a comment about the boat being “shiny when they’re brand new,” but he didn’t know anything that others there didn’t know.

I saw him in the airport with my family days later when we were flying down to the islands and even after reminding him we’d just met he made me feel I wasn’t worthy of his time.

But hey, there are plenty of douches in the world, and clearly I wasn’t one of their grand prix bread and butter clients. More generally, there doesn’t seem to be much respect for the people who write the checks in sailing.

I can’t imagine why anyone wants to do so for the big racing programs. Depends on the loft you deal with. The primary reason for my years long relationship with Quantum was the service level delivered there. As a racer, I was often buying a few new sails year, I estimate I bought well over dozen sails from that the loft.

I wasn’t a Grand Prix program at all, but I was still writing a five figure check most years. The first year with my A few years later, we invited him to Block Island Race Week with us, and he sailed with us throughout the season to build the team; we had a lot of fun.

But more important, I could show up on Thursday morning with a sail I screwed up the night before racing, and have it back in time for a weekend regatta. Things were turned around fast and prioritized because he got what I was doing, and even once I started cruising and sold the race boat the same level of service and trust was there ordering and servicing sails for the new boat.

That relationship was a bummer to leave behind, just like my rigger. People that understand how you think and help you figure out how best to help you to meet your needs instead of just trying to upsell and oversell you on the latest flash upgrade.

As I wrote a bit up thread – the thing I am most interested in is how North will price dacron 3di – do you know, can you tell us – say compared to a similar speced dpi norlam sail – or say the actual price for a norlam and a 3di dacron for your sunfast retail pricing, not beta test pricing??

By the way, testing woven and laminated flat goods is not difficult. You actually always publish 6 numbers 0, 45 and 90 axis pull, fresh and fluttered. That essentially gives you all you need to know to compare two similar products.

However all this is easy to do. It is automated and North has the correct machinery. It would be lovely if you would help us get North to provide valuable data for customer decision making – pick up the phone and call Tom and Dan and tell them we are good guys just trying to get some hard data to understand our sail options better.

Now testing 3di and 3dl is rather more difficult. Because the fiber layout is ‘custom’. So you have no ‘standard’ measurement. It still can be done but there is a lot more room for fudging the results either intentionally or unintentionally.

As to reliability – my experience with 3di suggests the failure mode has been and is going to be rather different than prior sail constructions. In prior constructions you basically had ‘aging’; some fast, and some slow – depending on specific fabric, environmental conditions and user handling.

With 3di you have much more ‘QA failures’ and ‘infant mortality’, and then much slower aging. The aging factor will depend a lot on the specific fiber mix. It is the real world net of those factors that determines the ‘success’ of the trade-offs.

For 3dl it did not work out so well for cruisers even after north said it was production ready and reliable in the racing world. KDH – I dont have any particular ‘hate’ for North.

I had also had terrific customer relationships with doyle they made me some truly excellent ‘cruising’ code zeros where North had a cloth gap in their product line and with Quantum’s special projects group.

Evans, I wasn’t thinking of you at all with the North “hate. These fibers are all pretty elastic. So whoever said that was blowing smoke up your skirt. Also flutter and accelerated age testing can and should be done, it is common in other industries.

I understand the crimp thing, and Hydranet and Fibercon products which are warp oriented claim to have low or no crimp in the warp. I also agree that the big difference may be radial construction, especially on a modern planform – surely crosscut cannot possibly do a good job of fiber stress alignment.

The questions remain – does the PE content in these hybrid cloths carry any load, all the load, or some of the load when certain stretch levels are reached? Or is it simply a marketing gimmick?

Sailing is rife with marketing gimmicks I’m actually quite surprised someone hasn’t introduced plain crosscut dacron sails with printing on them making them look like carbon string sails.

There is a market for these I’m sure. As they reportedly used to say at Carrol marine, just paint it black and the customer will think it’s carbon – they don’t know the difference. Now onto 3Di Dacron: It has been stated that they do not mold or mildew.

I can easily collect 10 gallons of water in my main sitting in the cradle. It may sit there for months. Even with no glues to feed the biomass, there will be growth. Also, how is a repair done on these at sea or in 3rd world port?

Let’s say the batten pocket starts to come loose, or the batten retaining straps get damaged as happened to me just last season. I understood you cannot sew through them?

If you can sew through them, should North add one additional process step, and punch pinholes every 2 inches or so to let them drain and dry? For a racer, maybe 1 year is what they expect anyway and this is what North is used to.

I may be miles offshore and don’t have a car. And still they mildew. Like Trump, they believe what they say, and don’t know they are lying. If a J2EE application is deployed to three Managed Servers within a cluster, each Managed Server must be able to access the same application archive files from a shared or network-mounted directory in order to deploy the new J2EE application.

If multiple Managed Servers on multiple machines are used, the path to the application bits must be the same on all machines because there is a single point of entry for the application in the domain configuration.

The process to patch in a distributed environment depends on whether or not your Middleware home directory is shared or not shared. Consider the environment shown in Figure This is a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, each with its own local Middleware home and Fusion Middleware products inside the Middleware home:.

This is also a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, but the Middleware home on “Middleware Host 2” is shared or NFS mounted:. Below is the syntax for the OPatch utility:.

Acceptable values for command are described in Table Valid options for each command are described in the sections that describe each command. For details, see Section 2. The apply command in a Fusion Middleware environment applies the patch to the Oracle home on the local machine.

Sensitive information such as Administration Server credentials, and other important information such as the Administration Server URL, domain location and applications directory location, are obtained by prompts from the console.

In some cases, default values may be found and specified by OPatch; in these cases, press Enter to use these default values. Automation applications such as Grid Control may invoke OPatch with the -silent option, which does not prompt for any input from the console.

For Fusion Middleware components, userConfigFile and userKeyFile can be specified in the property file as keys with corresponding file names. The userConfigFile file contains an encrypted user name and password, while the userKeyFile contains a secret key that is used to encrypt and decrypt the user name and password.

Some patches are certified by Oracle Product Support as capable of being used with the -auto option, which can automate certain portions of your patching procedure. The -auto option applies the patch to the Oracle home; verifies that the patch is actually applied, then performs any necessary redeploy operations against the specified WebLogic Domain, including stopping and starting all the servers that are affected by the patch.

Beginning with OPatch release In order for OPatch to be used properly:. If the Managed Servers are up and running, OPatch will stop the servers, apply the patch, then restart the servers.

If the Managed Servers are not running, OPatch will apply the patch but then you must manually start the servers in order to see the effects of the patch. The -auto option should be used in conjunction with the -domain option; the only exception is if only one WebLogic Domain was configured from the Oracle home.

In such cases, OPatch will use that domain as the default domain. If multiple domains have been created and the -domain option is not used, then it is the user’s responsibility to run opatch deploy to redeploy the patched artifacts to their respective domains, and also stop and start the affected servers in each of the domains.

The apply command with the -auto option specified performs the following:. A summary of the options for the apply command are described in Table If -auto is used then -domain must also be used to indicate the name of the domain in which the rollout should occur; the exception is when there is only one domain configured out of the Oracle home, in which case the -domain flag is optional.

Optional – The Middleware home to which the patch will be applied. If neither is specified, then the Middleware home from where the command is run will be used. Optional – This option is used to specify the Oracle home to which the patch should be applied.

If neither is specified, OPatch will apply the updates to the Oracle home from which it was launched. Optional – print out the actions that will be taken by executing the command, but does not actually execute the command.

The rollback command allows you to remove an existing one-off patch by specifying the unique patch ID. The rollback command with the -auto option specified performs the following:.

A summary of the options for the rollback command are described in Table Use the -lsinventory option to display all applied patch IDs. Each one-off patch is uniquely identified by an ID.

To rollback to a previous patch version, that patch version’s ID must be supplied. Refer to Section 2. The location of the patch binaries must be specified using the -ph option.

If the patch is installed in the current Oracle home the Oracle home from which you are running this command then the -ph option is not required. If the patch is already applied to the Oracle home, the -id option can be used to specify the patch you want to use for deployment.

A summary of the options for the deploy command are described in Table The absolute path to the location of the patch. If none is specified, then the current directory is used.

The lshomes command lists all the Oracle homes pertaining to logical entities such as Host or Domain. For a Host, the list of Oracle homes is obtained from the machine’s central inventory. For a WebLogic domain, the list of homes is limited to product Oracle homes that are installed within a top-level Middleware home.

If the -domain or -domaindir option is used, the command lists the Oracle homes that have been used to create or extend the WebLogic domain. If not, all the homes registered with the machine’s central inventory or the inventory location specified using -invPtrLoc are listed.

When the Middleware home is specified and the -domain or -domaindir option is not specified, this command will list all the Oracle homes within the Middleware home that are registered with the machine’s central inventory or the specified inventory location.

A summary of the options for the lshomes command are described in Table Optional – list the Oracle homes that have been used to create or extend the WebLogic Domain at this location.

Optional – list only the Oracle homes registered with the machine’s central inventory that are located in this Middleware home. If neither is available, the Middleware home from which the command is executed will be used.

Optional – absolute path to the location of your oraInst. The lsdomains command lists all the WebLogic Domains that have been created from a certain Oracle home:. If the Oracle home is specified, then only those domains created from the specified Oracle home are listed.

If neither is available, then OPatch will use the Oracle home directory from which the command is run. If a Middleware home is specified, all domains created from all Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home are listed.

A summary of the options for the lsdomains command are described in Table This checkApplicable command produces a list of Oracle homes to which the patch can be applied. For Fusion Middleware, this command is limited in scope to the top-level Middleware home:.

If only the Middleware home is specified, OPatch will check to see whether or not this patch can be applied to all Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home. If an Oracle home is specified in addition to the Middleware home, OPatch will check to see if the patch can be applied to the specified Oracle home in the specified Middleware home.

A summary of the options for the checkApplicable command are described in Table Optional – location of the patch for which you want to run the checkApplicable command.

If not specified, then the patch in the current directory is used. The checkInstalledOneOffs command checks to see if the specified patch or patches have been applied to certain Oracle homes or WebLogic Domains:. If a Middleware home is specified, OPatch checks all the Oracle homes within the specified Middleware home that are registered with the machine’s central inventory.

A summary of the options for the checkInstalledOneOffs command are described in Table ID of the patch or patches that you want to check. Separate multiple patch IDs with a comma , character.

The start and stop commands allow Fusion Middleware runtime entities to be started or stopped, respectively. Only entities of the same type can be started or stopped; if you need to start or stop entities of multiple types, you must run this command separately for each entity type.

A summary of the options for the start and stop commands are described in Table The name of the WebLogic or Fusion Middleware entity you want to start or stop. Only entities of the same type can be specified; multiple entities should be separated by a comma.

The fmwContainer option starts or stops the container for example, the WebLogic Server hosting the application. The fmwServer option starts or stops the actual java process that is running for example, a Managed Server.

Optional – the absolute path to the Oracle home directory. If neither is available, then the Oracle home from which the command is executed is used. This section describes common issues you may encounter when running the OPatch utility in a Fusion Middleware environment.

The machine name of the Administration Server and Managed Servers must be set to a valid value. It cannot be set to blank or None. It cannot be set to blank or localhost. These values need to be properly set only once; you will not need to reset them should you ever need to patch your software.

Click the New button to create a new machine. Specify a name and select the operating system. For each Managed Server, assign the machine you just created. In the Listen Address field, specify the name of the host on which the Node Manager is listening.

Click Save when you are finished. If you encounter any problems, revert back to the saved version of the config. The following topics are covered: A patch set exception also known as a PSE, one-off, or interim patch This is usually a single fix for a single problem.

A patch bundle also known as an MLR patch This type of patch is created by putting several fixes into a single patch. Security Patches also known as Critical Patch Updates or CPUs Security patches are different from other patch types in that they only fix a single or small number of problems, and that they should be applied as soon as possible — when a security patch is released extra attention is brought to the existence of the security problem.

Access and log into My Oracle Support at the following location: In the search results, click on the link corresponding to document ID PATH Points to the location s from which various commands should be run. OPatch can be used to patch any Fusion Middleware product, even though only a few are shown in this example.

Take note of the following: The steps that need to be performed for this scenario are as follows: Use the opatch apply command to apply the bits to an Oracle home. Steps 1 and 3 are performed by the Fusion Middleware capabilities in OPatch.

This is a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, each with its own local Middleware home and Fusion Middleware products inside the Middleware home: This is also a distributed environment, where you have identical topologies on separate machines, but the Middleware home on “Middleware Host 2” is shared or NFS mounted: Below is the syntax for the OPatch utility: The option to apply a patch to a Middleware home including all Oracle homes inside that Middleware home is not yet available.