Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka – 3 4 – ar


valid until 2018/1/23

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

19.03.2018 – Within each of PhotoDirector’s modes, a left-side panel offers mode-appropriate options. For excellent results, try DxO Optics Pro.

Free download cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka for windows free

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

What’s New?

1. 6PowerDirector includes over 500 effects, including animated themes, title effects, transition effects, particle effects and PiP objects. Ideally, I would suggest you go to the CyberLink website and download the free 30-day trial version and play with that for awhile.
2. 10 Everything in Ultra plus high-end video templates span’. Comment 2 people found this helpful.http://softik.org/zte-blade-i2/You can also apply slow motion effects, or freeze and zoom to footage highlights. The Ultra level which is the only version available for Macs adds some high-power tools such as bracketed HDR, auto lens corrections, split toning, photo stacks, and 4K video slideshows.

3. 5 You must purchase at least one item from Amazon to post a comment. http://softik.org/software-qa-test-com-for-care/Raw conversion detail and color were excellent, though Lightroom brought out more colors and Capture One Pro more detail.

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Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka

4. 5 My advice, especially if you are rendering high definition video, would be to download both trial versions and try them for yourself.Cyberlink power director ultra 7 akaHere’s what PC Mag had to say, “PowerDirector is the fastest and most capable consumer-level video editing software for Windows around, and it’s the first 360-degree video editor for VR footage. Showing its ambitions to be more than just a photo workflow application competing with Lightroom, PhotoDirector includes layer editing.

5. 1 Yeah, keep it Undo Close.

6. 4 It also lacked a profile for the Canon EF-M mm. Would you like to tell us about a lower price?

7. 6 It’s fun to see the dazzling artistic effects all these choices enable. You can drag layer entries to change their order.

Version cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka versao brasileira

PhotoDirector, CyberLink’s photo-editing softwarealways impresses with its clear interface and quick operation. It’s an affordable tool that gives Adobe a run for its money in photo workflow and editing software, though it lacks some of the most powerful features found in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Still, it offers drawing tools, gradients, face-beautification tools, blur effects, and camera-and-lens profile-based corrections. Advanced features include face tagging, content-aware object removal, and there’s even a body-slimming tool.

With the release of version 8, PhotoDirector moves further into Photoshop territory, with an emphasis on layer tools and content-aware editing tools. Other cool new capabilities include multiple exposure effects and the ability to capture sharp stills from video content.

A fully functioning day free trial for either version of PhotoDirector is available for the price of your email address. Once installed, the program requires more than MB on disk, so keep some space available.

And there’s a complementary Windows tablet photo-editing app that lets you edit photos on the go. PhotoDirector is a bit application, meaning you can take advantage of more than cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka of RAM—something you’ll want when you have a lot of high-res photos open and are doing heavy image manipulation.

As is common among pro- and near-pro-level photo workflow apps, PhotoDirector uses modes. That means there are global tabs or buttons that switch the interface among different functions, usually organizing, editing, and sharing.

PhotoDirector has six modes: Unlike Lightroom, PhotoDirector doesn’t let you choose which of these mode buttons appears. So for example, if you never print, you still can’t remove the Print button.

Switching modes is as simple as it is in Lightroom. Within each of PhotoDirector’s modes, a left-side panel offers mode-appropriate options. In the Library and Adjustment modes, the panel is further broken down into two tabs, Project and Metadata for the first, and Manual and Presets for the second.

The main viewing area is flexible, with a few options of its own. In Library mode, a large view of the photo sits above a filmstrip-style look at other pictures in the folder.

Alternatively, buttons at the top let you see just the photo, a gallery browser of thumbnails or filenames, or a full-screen view of just the current photo. In addition to viewing one large image, you can also compare two or several in Library mode.

The gallery view can be filtered by photos you’ve flagged or color labeled, or those you’ve edited. I’d like to see more filter options, such as camera model and lens, as you get in Lightroom. Hover the mouse over a thumbnail in gallery view, and you see star rating and flagging buttons for easy rating and selecting.

When you’re viewing one large image, the same choices appear along the bottom with color labeling added; optionally, you can add controls for rotation and back and forward arrows. In Adjustment mode, you can see a split view showing an image before and after your edits.

Flipping through images was snappy and delay-free, as was overall program response—even on a less-than-stellar 2. Like Lightroom, PhotoDirector lets you zoom only to preset sizes—25 percent, 33 percent, and 50 percent, and so on—rather than offering a full-range slider like the one on ACDSee Pro.

But a single click switches between zoomed and unzoomed, which is convenient. You can’t detach the program’s panels to float anywhere on screen, as you can in ACDSee. Undo is well implemented, and an excellent adjustment history panel shows not only all previous tweaks but also a thumbnail at the top displaying a mini view of those tweaks’ effects.

Clicking on any history entry applies that point to the full image view. In all, PhotoDirector gets high marks for its interface. Raw conversion detail and color were excellent, though Lightroom brought out more colors and Capture One Pro more detail.

And import speed was inconsistent; it went faster if I waited for the thumbnails to load into the import dialog. Another type of importing, tethered shooting, still isn’t supported by PhotoDirector, making it inappropriate for some pro photogs.

The program offers all the expected organizational tools with easily accessible ratings, color coding, and flagging tools in the Library interface. And as I’ll show in the next section, it even offers face tagging—a powerful organization tool that’s been available in Photoshop Elements but not Lightroom for a few years.

Geotagging and maps, however, are still absent. Basic Photo Adjustments and Edits PhotoDirector offers all cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka basic adjustments you’d expect, including exposure, contrast, white balance, and sharpness.

And the ubiquitous fixers—red eye and blemish removers—are added to the local adjustment brushes. Cropping and rotating follow the brilliant approach of Lightroom and Photoshop, showing you the final result rather than an outline of your intended crop.

PhotoDirector also has pro image-editing tools, such as curves and levels. The latter lets you manipulate highs, lows, and midtones with controls on a three-color histogram, with optional quarter-tone controls, too.

The tone curves tool gives only three control points. When it comes to pumping up or cutting down on overly dark or bright areas, PhotoDirector adds a couple of levels in between the standard brights, midtones, and darks.

PhotoDirector’s “Auto tone” magic wand button, like similar tools in every photo app, worked beautifully for some photos, but not so well for others. The program’s geometry adjustment tools let you fix the barrel and pincushion distortion of telephoto and wide lenses.

The Keystone correction tool’s vertical and horizontal controls let me straighten distorted lines at the sides of photos of buildings. I’m still not overly impressed by the program’s lens-profile-based geometry corrections see belowand there is no equivalent of Lightroom’s Upright feature, which corrects perspective issues.

This could be the coolest thing to hit PhotoDirector in version 8. Take a group of up to 10 action shots while keeping the camera still, and PhotoDirector can automagically produce a multiple exposure like the one below.

Doing the same thing in Photoshop would involve selecting the person in all six images and creating masks and layers. PhotoDirector even lets you apply a fade-in or fade-out effect to the sequence.

It also lets you reduce the number of exposures from a drop-down, rather than making you recreate the merge. Showing its ambitions to be more than just a photo workflow application competing with Lightroom, PhotoDirector includes layer editing.

I was leery about this kind of tool cluttering a program that’s designed for efficient workflow; there’s a reason Lightroom doesn’t require photographers to mess with layer editing. But PhotoDirector’s tool doesn’t clutter things up—unless you consider a Layers mode button atop the interface to be clutter.

When you enter the mode, a dialog tells you it’s best to complete all overall photo adjustments lighting, white balance, and the like prior to working with layers.

If you don’t want to spring for Photoshop CChere are your layers. New in the latest version are more blending modes, blending mode preview when you hover the mouse over the options, and Express Layer Templates.

There are now 16 blending modes, which offers a lot of creative options, though it’s still short of Photoshop’s I like how you can solo and edit a layer by double-clicking on its cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka image, but Photoshop’s right-click options are a bit more helpful.

Only four Express Templates are included by default, but you can download a choice of 16 more from CyberLink’s online repository, DirectorZone, and users of that service can contribute their own creations.

The templates usually include filter effects and text overlays. You can customize them with drawing and selection tools, including a Magic Wand selector. This new tool actually offers more than its name suggests: You can use it to create a panorama from a video clip, a group photo from a video with everyone making an acceptable expression, or a multiple-exposure image like those you can make from stills.

You start from the Video-to-Photo button right cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka the Import button. Of course, the feature does let you make still photos from video, but in my testing, it couldn’t sharpen a moving subject.

And the same problem made multiple-exposure shots from video a lot less appealing than those created from stills. Likewise, the Panorama feature worked, but was less automatic than I’d like.

You still have to select frames from a video you play through, and in my first attempt I hadn’t overlapped the frames enough to get a full panorama. The tool does let you auto-fill areas of the photo that result from combining perpectives—a nice content-aware feature.

This is an effect that’s been around for a while, at least since Spielberg’s Schindler’s List. It’s where you only let one color in a photo appear, and leave the rest in black and white.

PhotoDirector’s tool not only lets you select a specific color to show, but you can have it appear only on a selected object, rather than every instance of that color, with a brush that selectively removes the color.

A Tolerance slider is also helpful in isolating a color. Below is an example where only the blues appear. This tool has three subsets: Note that anything you do here can be undone, since a working copy is created.

On my test image, the Face Shaper basically tucked in jowls. These tools let you draw on top of your images and superimpose text, as well as add shapes, fills, and gradients. You can select areas with a lasso and a smart lasso, but PhotoDirector’s selection tools are not as smart as Adobe’s.

This program offers a lot of the layer-blending modes found in Photoshop, including Darken, Multiply, Difference, and Exclusion—14 in all. You can drag layer entries to change their order.

You can even go in and adjust any layer separately with the standard lighting, color, and detail tools. The Blur Tools section in Editing mode makes it easy to add not only blur but also bokehzoom focus, and tilt-shift effects.

It’s as fun, powerful, and interesting as the motion-blur tool in Photoshop Elements. This tool does a good job of cleaning up a noisy shot, and makes doing so a snap.

Often this kind of feature make you tinker with sliders to deal with chrominance and luminance noise, and PhotoDirector does offer these sliders, but its magic wand de-noising button did a fine job of reducing noise from my test images’ dark areas.

At full zoom, my results did look a tad blurred, but when viewing the whole photo, the smoothing was a big improvement. It’s accessible in Edit mode, and you can drag up to five photos shot at different exposures of the same subject from the tray to the main editing area.

A merge button combines all the images, which took about 15 seconds on my five-shot test. The merge lined up the images well, and a checkbox let me remove “ghosting”—in the case of my shot, traffic that differed from shot to shot.

The end result is pleasing, and you can tinker with it even further by adjusting Glow, Edge, Detail, and Tone, or by choosing a preset look. It’s fun to see the dazzling artistic effects all these choices enable.

This tool has been a feather in the cap of programs including Adobe Lightroom and DxO Optics pro for a while.

Cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka york

Easily create the most enchanting and memorable wedding video with a collection of exclusively designed themes and templates. View Designer is a unique PowerDirector innovation that enables you to use 360-degree video footage in standard video projects. I’ve lost a lot of valuable time fighting bug issues and have received the generic tech support responses. Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. I was leery about this kind of tool cluttering a program that’s designed for efficient workflow; there’s a reason Lightroom doesn’t require photographers to mess with layer editing.

Mustang cyberlink power director ultra 7 aka jpg

The application offers support for plugins. For example, the multicam designer lets users import, synchronize, and edit footage captured from 4 different camera angles shot at the same time , select scenes and leave out the unwanted ones, as well as add background music and preview the project before putting together a music video.

The theme designer is similar to the multicam designer. However, it also allows users to edit themes and style templates. It can produce 3D media from personal photos and videos, apply effects, change the background music, add captions, arrange the timeline, and so on.

The bottom part of the frame holds a timeline that can be easily populated with media files by just dragging and dropping them, and their position can be adjusted to fit the movie can be swapped for storyboard mode.

There is a large collection of effects available in regard to image filters, objects, particles, titles, and transitions applicable to the movie. In addition, the audio tracks can be mixed, while voice narration can be recorded.

Users may also insert chapters at specific positions in the movie to better organize it, along with subtitles. The project can be saved to file, uploaded to the CyberLink Cloud to access it from any location, and resumed at a later time.

The tool also integrates a feature for producing multiple movies in batch mode. Keyboard shortcuts are supported for most important commands and they can be customized. As previously mentioned, the software utility is capable of producing movies in various formats.

They can be standard 2D e. BlackBerry, Windows Phone , as well as prepared for online publishing e. CyberLink PowerDirector features advanced configuration settings that can be customized.

For example, it is possible to select the audio channel mode, timeline frame rate, drop frame timecode, sound waveform display in timeline, and HD video processing mode. Users may also disable confirmation dialogs, select the default transition behavior and workspace, durations e.

It features an easy editing mode and simple slideshow creator for novices who don’t want to go through the trouble of learning all its options and configuration settings. On the other hand, advanced users can take them for a spin in the full-featured editing mode.

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Views Read Edit View history. This page was last edited on 22 February 2018, at 01: Like Lightroom, PhotoDirector lets you zoom only to preset sizes—25 percent, 33 percent, and 50 percent, and so on—rather than offering a full-range slider like the one on ACDSee Pro.

But a single click switches between zoomed and unzoomed, which is convenient. You can’t detach the program’s panels to float anywhere on screen, as you can in ACDSee. Undo is well implemented, and an excellent adjustment history panel shows not only all previous tweaks but also a thumbnail at the top displaying a mini view of those tweaks’ effects.

Clicking on any history entry applies that point to the full image view. In all, PhotoDirector gets high marks for its interface. Raw conversion detail and color were excellent, though Lightroom brought out more colors and Capture One Pro more detail.

And import speed was inconsistent; it went faster if I waited for the thumbnails to load into the import dialog. Another type of importing, tethered shooting, still isn’t supported by PhotoDirector, making it inappropriate for some pro photogs.

The program offers all the expected organizational tools with easily accessible ratings, color coding, and flagging tools in the Library interface. And as I’ll show in the next section, it even offers face tagging—a powerful organization tool that’s been available in Photoshop Elements but not Lightroom for a few years.

Geotagging and maps, however, are still absent. Basic Photo Adjustments and Edits PhotoDirector offers all the basic adjustments you’d expect, including exposure, contrast, white balance, and sharpness.

And the ubiquitous fixers—red eye and blemish removers—are added to the local adjustment brushes. Cropping and rotating follow the brilliant approach of Lightroom and Photoshop, showing you the final result rather than an outline of your intended crop.

PhotoDirector also has pro image-editing tools, such as curves and levels. The latter lets you manipulate highs, lows, and midtones with controls on a three-color histogram, with optional quarter-tone controls, too.

The tone curves tool gives only three control points. When it comes to pumping up or cutting down on overly dark or bright areas, PhotoDirector adds a couple of levels in between the standard brights, midtones, and darks.

PhotoDirector’s “Auto tone” magic wand button, like similar tools in every photo app, worked beautifully for some photos, but not so well for others. The program’s geometry adjustment tools let you fix the barrel and pincushion distortion of telephoto and wide lenses.

The Keystone correction tool’s vertical and horizontal controls let me straighten distorted lines at the sides of photos of buildings. I’m still not overly impressed by the program’s lens-profile-based geometry corrections see below , and there is no equivalent of Lightroom’s Upright feature, which corrects perspective issues.

This could be the coolest thing to hit PhotoDirector in version 8. Take a group of up to 10 action shots while keeping the camera still, and PhotoDirector can automagically produce a multiple exposure like the one below.

Doing the same thing in Photoshop would involve selecting the person in all six images and creating masks and layers. PhotoDirector even lets you apply a fade-in or fade-out effect to the sequence. It also lets you reduce the number of exposures from a drop-down, rather than making you recreate the merge.

Showing its ambitions to be more than just a photo workflow application competing with Lightroom, PhotoDirector includes layer editing. I was leery about this kind of tool cluttering a program that’s designed for efficient workflow; there’s a reason Lightroom doesn’t require photographers to mess with layer editing.

But PhotoDirector’s tool doesn’t clutter things up—unless you consider a Layers mode button atop the interface to be clutter. When you enter the mode, a dialog tells you it’s best to complete all overall photo adjustments lighting, white balance, and the like prior to working with layers.

If you don’t want to spring for Photoshop CC , here are your layers. New in the latest version are more blending modes, blending mode preview when you hover the mouse over the options, and Express Layer Templates.

There are now 16 blending modes, which offers a lot of creative options, though it’s still short of Photoshop’s I like how you can solo and edit a layer by double-clicking on its thumbnail image, but Photoshop’s right-click options are a bit more helpful.

Only four Express Templates are included by default, but you can download a choice of 16 more from CyberLink’s online repository, DirectorZone, and users of that service can contribute their own creations.

The templates usually include filter effects and text overlays. You can customize them with drawing and selection tools, including a Magic Wand selector. This new tool actually offers more than its name suggests: You can use it to create a panorama from a video clip, a group photo from a video with everyone making an acceptable expression, or a multiple-exposure image like those you can make from stills.

You start from the Video-to-Photo button right above the Import button. Of course, the feature does let you make still photos from video, but in my testing, it couldn’t sharpen a moving subject.

And the same problem made multiple-exposure shots from video a lot less appealing than those created from stills. Likewise, the Panorama feature worked, but was less automatic than I’d like.

You still have to select frames from a video you play through, and in my first attempt I hadn’t overlapped the frames enough to get a full panorama. The tool does let you auto-fill areas of the photo that result from combining perpectives—a nice content-aware feature.